OS X El Capitan gives you simpler, smarter ways to do the things you do most with your Mac. Like working in multiple apps at the same time using Split View. Searching for information with an even more helpful Spotlight. Keeping your favorite websites handy with Pinned Sites. Managing your email with full-screen view and swipe gestures. And turning notes into useful checklists. Improvements under the hood make your Mac snappier and more efficient for all kinds of everyday tasks — from opening PDFs to loading your email. And with Metal for Mac, you get faster and more fluid graphics performance in games and high-performance apps.

  1. Mac Os X El Capitan Uninstall Apps

Split View

Mac os x el capitan uninstall app download

Here's how to uninstall Mac apps for good. First, you need to access the Library folder - this has been hidden by default since Mac OS X 10.6, but it's easy to reveal it. If you run OS X El Capitan (10.11) or later macOS As for the newer systems, sorry to tell you this, but the farthest you can get is resetting Safari and clearing all the info from it. In other words: it’s impossible to uninstall Safari in OS X El Capitan 10.11 and macOS Sierra 10.12.

Give two apps your undivided attention.

Running lots of apps at the same time is one of the great things about using a Mac. Focusing on just one app in full-screen view is another. With Split View, you get the best of both. It automatically fills your screen with the two apps you choose. So you can make dinner plans with a friend in Messages while finding the restaurant in Maps. Or work on a document in Pages while doing your research in Safari. All without the distraction of your other open apps, and without having to manually resize and drag windows around. And your desktop is always just a swipe away, so it’s easy to get back to everything else you were doing.

Installing Homebrew on Mac OS X prior to El Capitan (that is Yosemite, Mavericks and others) used to be a breeze. But with a new change in OS X El Capitan called SIP - installing Homebrew has become a bit complicated. In Recovery mode (see above). I also don't know whether El Capitan has Photos.app-dependent system processes or not, so your mac may potentially not work the way you want it after this. I have protected myself by first Archiving Photos.app and leaving Photos.app.zip in /Applications/, but again, I don't even know if this is good enough.

Mission Control

You’ve never been so good atspace management.

A streamlined Mission Control makes it easier to see and organize everything you have open on your Mac. With a single swipe, all the windows on your desktop arrange themselves in a single layer, with nothing stacked or hidden. Mission Control places your windows in the same relative location, so you can spot the one you’re looking for more quickly. And when you have lots of windows competing for screen space, it’s even easier to make more room for them. Just drag any window to the top of your screen and drop it into a new desktop space. It’s never been this easy to spread out your work.

Call out your cursor.

Lost your cursor on your crowded desktop? Just shake your finger back and forth on the trackpad or give your mouse a shake, and the pointer gets bigger so it’s easy to spot.

Spotlight

Even more versatile. And helpful.

Spotlight gets even smarter in El Capitan, delivering results for weather, sports, stocks, web video, and transit information. And now you can ask Spotlight to find a file using natural language — so when you’re looking for the presentation you created last Friday, just type “presentation I made on Friday.”1 Spotlight is also more flexible: You can resize its window to see more results and move it anywhere on your desktop.

Ask in your own words.

Searching for files has never been easier now that Spotlight understands natural language.1 For example, type “email from Harrison in April” and Spotlight shows you email messages that match. You can also use more complex searches, like “spreadsheet I worked on yesterday that contains budget,” and you’ll get just what you’re looking for. You can search with your own words in Mail and the Finder, too.

Mail

Look what just landed in your inbox.

Improved full-screen support and swipe gestures in Mail let you make quick work of your correspondence. OS X also helps you manage your calendar right from your inbox.

Work more easily in full screen.

The enhanced full-screen view in Mail lets you juggle all your email conversations at the same time. The email message you’re composing slides to the bottom of the screen, so you can access your inbox — perfect for copying text or attachments between messages. And if you’re managing multiple email threads, you can switch between them with easy-to-use tabs.

Add suggested events.

When you receive an email containing details for an event like a flight or a dinner reservation, you can add it to Calendar with just a click.1

Swipe to manage your inbox.

Now you can take care of your email with a swipe, just like on your iOS devices. Need to triage your inbox? Swipe right to mark an email as read or unread, or swipe left to delete. You’ll be focused on what’s important in no time.

Notes

Collect more than just your thoughts.

The powerful new Notes app is more than a great way to jot down a quick thought and keep track of it for later. Now you can turn a list into a checklist in a snap. Or easily add a photo, video, web link or map location to a note. And thanks to iCloud, all your notes and everything in them are kept up to date across all your devices. So you can create a note on your Mac and look at it on your iPhone when you’re out and about.

Add all kinds of content.

Notes easily handles almost any type of file you’d like to include. Save documents, web links, photos, map locations, PDFs, videos and more to a note with a simple drag and drop.

Save content from other apps.

Planning a trip? Save a hotel website to a note right from Safari, or a restaurant address from Maps. You can save content to Notes from many other apps as well. Just click the Share button in an app to save items to existing notes or create new ones.

Create useful checklists with a click.

Now it’s easy to create checklists in Notes. With a single click, you can create an interactive to-do list, grocery list or wish list. Then check off items as you complete them.

Use the Attachments Browser to see everything in one place.

All the attachments you’ve added to your notes are organized in one simple view: the new Attachments Browser. You can sort through photos, videos, map locations and web links without having to remember which note you put them in.

Your notes. On all your devices.

Notes works with iCloud, so your notes are up to date and with you no matter what device you’re using. Make a checklist on your Mac, and you’ll have it on your iPhone when you’re out on the go. Check an item off the list on your iPhone, and it’s checked off on your Mac. Take a picture on your iPhone, add it to a note, and it will be synced to all your devices. Any changes you make to a note on one device instantly appear on your other devices.

Photos

More things to do, places to go and people to see.

Give your photos a more personal touch with third-party editing tools. And with enhanced organization capabilities, support for the new Live Photos format and faster performance, the Photos app gets even better.

New editing extensions let you go further with your photos.

OS X El Capitan supports third-party tools that will be available from the Mac App Store and accessible right in the Photos app. Use multiple editing extensions from your favourite developers on a single photo, or use a mix of extensions and the editing tools built into Photos. From adding subtle filters to professional-quality noise reduction, you can take your photo editing to a whole new level.

Everything in its place.

Photos has been fine-tuned to make it even easier to manage your library. Now you can add a location to a single image or a group of photos. You can batch change photo titles, descriptions and keywords. Naming your favourite people in Faces is faster with a streamlined workflow. You can also sort your albums — and the contents inside them — by date, title and more.

Safari

The smartest way to surf.
With new tools built in.

With OS X El Capitan, the best browser for your Mac brings new tools for better surfing. Now Safari lets you keep favourite websites open and accessible with Pinned Sites. You can quickly mute audio without hunting for the tab it’s coming from. And use AirPlay to stream video from a web page to your HDTV.

Pinned Sites keep your favourite websites handy.

Keep websites you visit often — like your webmail, Facebook page or Twitter feed — open, up to date and easily accessible by pinning them. They’ll stay active in the background, and they’ll stay put on the left side of your tab bar.

Use AirPlay to share web video without sharing your whole screen.

Play video from a web page to your TV with Apple TV — without showing everything else on your desktop. Just click the AirPlay icon that appears on compatible web videos and you can watch your video on the big screen.

Easily tune out a tab.

Want to stop the music without hunting for the tab it’s coming from? Now you can mute it right from the Smart Search field. If you’re listening to audio in one tab and another website starts to play, you can mute the one you don’t want to hear. And if what you really want is silence, you can mute all audio from your browser, too.

Maps

Now arriving. Public transit info.

If you get around by train or bus, you can now get around more easily in select cities around the world thanks to Maps. You’ll find everything you need to go from point A to point B, including built-in public transportation maps, directions and schedules.

Mass appeal.

Choose a destination in Transit view and Maps offers you the best routes, with detailed walking, subway, train, bus and ferry directions. See routes for complex trips, such as linking a bus ride to a subway ride via a two-block walk. You can also plan your trip according to when you want to leave or when you need to arrive.

Get directions on your Mac.
Read them on the go.

Plan your route on your Mac, then send it to your iPhone with just a few clicks for stop-by-stop directions when you’re out and about.

Fonts

A distinctly modern take on type.

OS X El Capitan introduces new fonts that look crisp and beautiful on your Mac and in your documents — a modern, space-efficient system font called San Francisco, a new Chinese font called PingFang with thousands of redesigned characters and six new line weights, and four new Japanese fonts that offer even more choices for everything from presentations to email.

San Francisco

Designed from the ground up for use on all Apple devices, San Francisco has been fine-tuned for optimal readability on a Mac, and looks particularly crisp and refined on a Retina display. The new San Francisco system font optimizes legibility with size-specific letter shapes and dynamic character spacing. You’ll feel its subtle effect in the things you do every day.

Distinct characters

Similar characters like a capital I, lowercase L, and the number 1 are now more easily distinguished.

Dynamic spacing

Spacing between letters and words shifts depending on the font size, which helps readability.

PingFang
Enhanced readability.

The new Chinese system font PingFang was designed specifically for digital displays, delivering unmatched legibility in both Simplified and Traditional Chinese.

More variety.

PingFang is available in six weights from ultralight to semibold. The different weights give you flexibility for headlines, captions and more.

Japanese Fonts
YuMincho +36p Kana
Tsukushi B Round Gothic
New document fonts.

Mac Os X El Capitan Uninstall Apps

OS X El Capitan includes four new Japanese fonts, each available in two weights, that add personality to your documents and presentations.

Hiragino Sans
Enhanced Hiragino Sans.

Hiragino Sans, the Japanese system font for OS X, now offers a full set of ten line weights for use in documents.

Input Methods

Mac becomes even more fluent.

Now it’s easier to write Chinese and Japanese text on your Mac.

Chinese
Advanced keyboard input.

Thanks to advanced learning capabilities that quickly memorize your word choices, using the keyboard to input Chinese has never been simpler or faster. Vocabulary lists are frequently updated so you can use the latest words and phrases, and a smarter candidate window displays more character selections.

Improved trackpad handwriting.

Enter characters on the trackpad as swiftly and accurately as you do on paper — just by using your finger. A new Trackpad window reflects the proportions of your physical trackpad, gives you more room to write and lets you write multiple characters in a row.

Japanese
Live conversion for keyboard input.

OS X El Capitan dramatically improves the ease and speed of entering Japanese text. With an enhanced vocabulary and improved language engine, it automatically transforms Hiragana into written Japanese as you type — eliminating the need to press the space bar for individual word conversions.

What are startup items?

Startup items, or login items, are services and applications that launch every time you start your Mac. These are applications that sneak into startup items without notice, never asking if you need or want them there. This way you may end up with a dozen apps launching as soon as you turn on your Mac, weighing heavily on its processor and memory capacities and slowing it down. Such items can increase your Mac’s startup time and decrease its performance.

Plus, sometimes when you remove an application or a service, it leaves a login item with a broken link. These broken login items are completely useless, cause unwanted messages, and waste your Mac's resources (because they look for non-existent applications). Whether you're running macOS Catalina or El Capitan, or earlier — it's all the same, so just read on.

So, let's go over how to take control of login items, and how to get rid of unwanted, broken or hidden startup items.

How to disable startup programs?

Do you want to stop programs from running at startup? There’s an easy way to remove programs from startup and get your Mac to load faster on launch. The fastest way to turn off startup items on Mac is an app like CleanMyMac X.

  1. Download CleanMyMac for free.
  2. Launch the app.
  3. Open Optimization tab.
  4. Click on Login items.
  5. From the list of apps, disable the ones you don’t need on startup.
  6. Done!

How to change startup programs manually?

Disabling Mac startup programs is possible manually. Therefore, if you have some time and would like to do it yourself, follow the steps below.

Your login items are listed in settings. One of the easiest ways to control startup items is inside System Preferences > Users & Groups.

  1. Open System Preferences.
  2. Go to Users & Groups.
  3. Choose your nickname on the left.
  4. Choose Login items tab.
  5. Check startup programs you want to remove.
  6. Press the “–” sign below.
  7. You’re done.
  8. If you need to add an item back, press “+” and choose the app you’d like add.
  9. Then restart your Mac to see the changes.

How to fix broken startup items?

Broken Mac startup files are left there because some part of apps are left on your Mac long after you’ve moved the app to the Trash. To get rid of these parts and to fix your startup, you’re going to need CleanMyMac again. First, you need to check if they’re among startup items and disable them if so. You can do it following the instructions above. Then you need to remove app leftovers. CleanMyMac works fine on macOS High Sierra and earlier OS.

  1. Launch CleanMyMac.
  2. Choose Uninstaller tab.
  3. Scroll through the list of apps.
  4. If you spot any app that you’ve deleted, check them.
  5. Delete the app leftovers you’ve chosen.

You can also find and remove broken login items with the help of System Junk module:

  1. Choose System Junk tab.
  2. Click Scan.
  3. Review details and click Clean.

Finally, you need to clean your macOS startup items through launch services:

  1. Open Maintenance tab.
  2. Choose Rebuild Launch Services.
  3. Hit Run.
  4. Done.

Once you do it, all broken app data on your Mac will be fixed.

Remove daemons and agents from startup process

If speaking of files, first go to the system folder /Library/StartUpItems. Here you’ll find all the startup files that are being launched with the system. You can delete the login item you think is necessary if you’re totally sure what you are doing.

Also, the /Library/LaunchDaemons folder contains a bunch of preference files that define how the application that is being launched along with the system should work. You might want to delete some of these files as well if you know you don’t need them and removing them is safe.

The /Library/LaunchAgents contains preference files responsible for the apps that launch during the login process (not the startup).

The above-mentioned folders contain app-related files. However, you can also check system folders to review whether you need some of the system applications to be running on startup:

  1. /System/Library/LaunchDaemons - note that besides preference files this folder contains other important system items that are recommended to keep untouched.
  2. /System/Library/LaunchAgents - most probably, you won’t also find anything worth removing in this folder, however, keeping this location in mind might help you find files related to a problematic app that causes troubles on Mac startup. If you have a problematic application that messes about on login, you can try to trace it back from this folder.

But, if you’re looking for simple ways to remove login items, we suggest using a professional Mac utility. Download CleanMyMac X for free and make unwanted and broken login items a thing of the past.

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