Via Users & Groups Login Items. If you want to stop multiple apps from opening on startup, using. MacOS High Sierra: How to Disable Split View in Mail. If you click on a new mail notification while you’re on a full screen app, rather than switching back to Mail, it splits whatever you. To stop using the Mail app, first disable or delete your email accounts. Click the Mail menu in Mail and select Accounts. Uncheck the Mail option for accounts you no longer want to use Mail with. Mail will stop downloading emails from those accounts. But this isn’t enough! Add or remove email accounts in Mail on Mac. Use the Mail app to send, receive, and manage email for all of your email accounts in one location. Simply add the accounts—such as iCloud, Exchange, Google, school, work, or other—you want to use in Mail. In the Mail app on your Mac, select one or more mailboxes, then choose Mailbox Export Mailbox. Choose a folder or create a new folder, then click Choose. Mail exports the mailboxes as.mbox packages. If you previously exported a mailbox, Mail doesn’t overwrite the existing.mbox file; it creates a new.mbox file, such as My Mailbox 3.mbox.

  1. Disable Mail App Gpo
  2. Disable Mail On Mac
  3. Disable Mail App Macos Installer
-->

This article lists and describes the different settings you can control on macOS devices. As part of your mobile device management (MDM) solution, use these settings to allow or disable features, set password rules, allow or restrict specific apps, and more.

These settings are added to a device configuration profile in Intune, and then assigned or deployed to your macOS devices.

Note

The user interface may not match the enrollment types in this article. The information in this article is correct. The user interface is being updated in an upcoming release.

Before you begin

Create a macOS device restrictions configuration profile.

Note

These settings apply to different enrollment types. For more information on the different enrollment types, see macOS enrollment.

Built-in Apps

Settings apply to: All enrollment types

  • Block Safari AutoFill: Yes disables the autofill feature in Safari on devices. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow users to change autocomplete settings in the web browser.

  • Block use of camera: Yes prevents access to the camera on devices. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow access to the device camera.

    Intune only manages access to the device camera. It doesn't have access to pictures or videos.

  • Block Apple Music: Yes reverts the Music app to classic mode, and disables the Music service. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow using the Apple Music app.

  • Block spotlight suggestions: Yes stops Spotlight from returning any results from an Internet search. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow Spotlight search to connect to the Internet, and get search results.

  • Block file transfer using Finder or iTunes: Yes disables application file sharing services. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow application file sharing services.

    This feature applies to:

    • macOS 10.13 and newer

Cloud and storage

Settings apply to: All enrollment types

  • Block iCloud Keychain sync: Yes disables syncing credentials stored in the Keychain to iCloud. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow users to sync these credentials.

  • Block iCloud Desktop and Document Sync: Yes prevents iCloud from syncing documents and data. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow document and key-value synchronization to your iCloud storage space.

  • Block iCloud Mail Backup: Yes prevents iCloud from syncing to the macOS Mail app. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow Mail synchronization to iCloud.

  • Block iCloud Contact Backup: Yes prevents iCloud from syncing the device contacts. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow contact sync using iCloud.

  • Block iCloud Calendar Backup: Yes prevents iCloud from syncing to the macOS Calendar app. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow Calendar synchronization to iCloud.

  • Block iCloud Reminder Backup: Yes prevents iCloud from syncing to the macOS Reminders app. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow Reminders synchronization to iCloud.

  • Block iCloud Bookmark Backup: Yes prevents iCloud from syncing the device Bookmarks. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow Bookmark synchronization to iCloud.

  • Block iCloud Notes Backup: Yes prevents iCloud from syncing the device Notes. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow Notes synchronization to iCloud.

  • Block iCloud Photos backup: Yes disables iCloud Photo Library, and prevents iCloud from syncing the device photos. Any photos not fully downloaded from iCloud Photo Library are removed from local storage on devices. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow syncing photos between the device and the iCloud Photo Library.

  • Block Handoff: This feature allows users to start work on a macOS device, and then continue the work they started on another iOS/iPadOS or macOS device. Yes prevents the Handoff feature on devices. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow this feature on devices.

    This feature applies to:

    • macOS 10.15 and newer

Connected devices

Settings apply to: All enrollment types

  • Block AirDrop: Yes prevents using AirDrop on devices. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow using the AirDrop feature to exchange content with nearby devices.
  • Block Apple Watch auto unlock: Yes prevents users from unlocking their macOS device with their Apple Watch. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow users to unlock their macOS device with their Apple Watch.

Domains

Settings apply to: All enrollment types

  • Unmarked Email Domains: Enter one or more Email domain URLs to the list. When users send or receive an email from a domain other than the domains you added, the email is marked as untrusted in the macOS Mail app.

General

Settings apply to: All enrollment types

  • Block Lookup: Yes prevents user from highlighting a word, and then looking up its definition on the device. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow the definition lookup feature.

  • Block dictation: Yes stops users from using voice input to enter text. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow users to use dictation input.

  • Block content caching: Yes prevents content caching. Content caching stores app data, web browser data, downloads, and more locally on devices. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might enable content caching.

    For more information on content caching on macOS, see Manage content caching on Mac (opens another website).

    This feature applies to:

    • macOS 10.13 and newer
  • Block screenshots and screen recording: Device must be enrolled in Apple's Automated Device Enrollment (DEP). Yes prevents users from saving screenshots of the display. It also prevents the Classroom app from observing remote screens. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow users to capture screenshots, and allows the Classroom app to view remote screens.

Settings apply to: User approved device enrollment, Automated device enrollment (supervised)

  • Defer software updates: Yes allows you to delay when OS updates and non-OS updates are shown on devices. This setting doesn't control when updates are or aren't installed. When nothing is selected, Intune doesn't change or update this setting.

    By default, the OS might show updates on devices as Apple releases them. By default, software updates aren't delayed. If you configure this setting, then OS and non-OS software updates are delayed, depending on the options you select. The drop-down does exactly what you choose. It can delay both, delay neither, or delay one of them.

    For example, if a macOS update gets released by Apple on a specific date, then that update naturally shows on devices around the release date. Seed build updates are allowed without delay.

    • Delay visibility of software updates: Enter a value from 0-90 days. By default, updates are delayed for 30 days. This value applies to the Defer software updates options you select. If you only select Operating system updates, then only OS updates are delayed for 30 days. If you select Operating system updates and Non operating system updates, then both are delayed for 30 days.

      When the delay expires, users get a notification to update to the earliest version available when the delay was triggered.

      For example, if a macOS update is available on January 1, and Delay visibility is set to 5 days, then the update isn't shown as an available update. On the sixth day following the release, that update is available, and users can install it.

      This feature applies to:

      • macOS 10.13.4 and newer

Settings apply to: Automated device enrollment

  • Disable AirPlay, view screen by Classroom app, and screen sharing: Yes blocks AirPlay, and prevents screen sharing to other devices. It also prevents teachers from using the Classroom app to see their students' screens. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow teachers to see their students' screens.

    To use this setting, set the Block screenshots and screen recording setting to Not configured (screenshots are allowed).

  • Allow Classroom app to perform AirPlay and view screen without prompting: Yes lets teachers see their students' screens without requiring students to agree. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might require students to agree before teachers can see the screens.

    To use this setting, set the Block screenshots and screen recording setting to Not configured (screenshots are allowed).

  • Require teacher permission to leave Classroom app unmanaged classes: Yes forces students enrolled in an unmanaged Classroom course to get teacher approval to leave the course. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow students to leave the course whenever the student chooses.

  • Allow Classroom to lock the device without prompting: Yes lets teachers lock a student's device or app without the student's approval. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might require students agree before teachers can lock the device or app.

  • Students can automatically join Classroom class without prompting: Yes lets students join a class without prompting the teacher. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might require teacher approval to join a class.

Disable Mail App Gpo

Password

Disable Mail On Mac

These settings use the Passcode payload (opens Apple's web site).

Important

On macOS devices running 10.14.2 to 11 (except all versions of macOS 10.15 Catalina), users are prompted to change the device password when the device updates to a new major OS version. This password update happens once. After users update the password, any other password policies are enforced.

Also, any time the password policy is updated, all users running these macOS versions must change the password, even if the current password is compliant with the new requirements. For example, when your macOS device turns on after upgrading to Big Sur (macOS 11), users need to change the device password before they can sign in.

Settings apply to: All enrollment types

  • Require password: Yes requires users to enter a password to access devices. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might not require a password. It also doesn't force any restrictions, such as blocking simple passwords or setting a minimum length.

    • Required password type: Enter the required password complexity level your organization requires. When left blank, Intune doesn't change or update this setting. Your options:

      • Not configured: Uses the device default.
      • Alphanumeric: Includes uppercase letters, lowercase letters, and numeric characters.
      • Numeric: Password must only be numbers, such as 123456789.

      This feature applies to:

      • macOS 10.10.3 and newer
    • Number of non-alphanumeric characters in password: Enter the number of complex characters required in the password, from 0-4. A complex character is a symbol, such as ?. When left blank or set to Not configured, Intune doesn't change or update this setting.

    • Minimum password length: Enter the minimum length the password must have, from 4-16 characters. When left blank, Intune doesn't change or update this setting.

    • Block simple passwords: Yes prevents using simple passwords, such as 0000 or 1234. When the value is blank or set to Not configured, Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow simple passwords.

    • Maximum minutes of inactivity until screen locks: Enter the length of time devices must be idle before the screen is automatically locked. For example, enter 5 to lock devices after 5 minutes of being idle. When the value is blank or set to Not configured, Intune doesn't change or update this setting.

    • Maximum minutes after screen lock before password is required: Enter the length of time devices must be inactive before a password is required to unlock it. When the value is blank or set to Not configured, Intune doesn't change or update this setting.

    • Password expiration (days): Enter the number of days until the device password must be changed, from 1-65535. For example, enter 90 to expire the password after 90 days. When the password expires, users are prompted to create a new password. When the value is blank or set to Not configured, Intune doesn't change or update this setting.

    • Prevent reuse of previous passwords: Restrict users from creating previously used passwords. Enter the number of previously used passwords that can't be used, from 1-24. For example, enter 5 so users can't set a new password to their current password or any of their previous four passwords. When the value is blank, Intune doesn't change or update this setting.

    • Maximum allowed sign-in attempts: Enter the maximum number of times that users can consecutively try to sign in before the device locks users out, from 2-11. When this number is exceeded, the device is locked. We recommend not setting this value to a low number, such as 2 or 3. It's common for users to enter the wrong password. We recommend setting to a higher value.

      For example, enter 5 so users can enter the wrong password up to five times. After the fifth attempt, the device is locked. If you leave this value blank, or don't change it, then 11 is used by default.

      After six failed attempts, macOS automatically forces a time delay before a passcode can be entered again. The delay increases with each attempt. Set the Lockout duration to add a delay before the next passcode can be entered.

      • Lockout duration: Enter the number of minutes a lockout lasts, from 0-10000. During a device lockout, the sign in screen is inactive, and users can't sign in. When the lockout ends, user can try to sign in again.

        If you leave this value blank, or don't change it, then 30 minutes is used by default.

        This setting applies to:

        • macOS 10.10 and newer
  • Block user from modifying passcode: Yes stops the passcode from being changed, added, or removed. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow passcodes to be added, changed, or removed.

  • Block Touch ID to unlock device: Yes prevents using fingerprints to unlock devices. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow users to unlock the device using a fingerprint.

  • Block password AutoFill: Yes prevents using the AutoFill Passwords feature on macOS. Choosing Yes also has the following impact:

    • Users aren't prompted to use a saved password in Safari or in any apps.
    • Automatic Strong Passwords are disabled, and strong passwords aren't suggested to users.

    When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow these features.

  • Block password proximity requests: Yes prevents devices from requesting passwords from nearby devices. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow these password requests.

  • Block password sharing: Yes prevents sharing passwords between devices using AirDrop. When set to Not configured (default), Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, the OS might allow passwords to be shared.

Privacy preferences

Disable Mail App Macos Installer

On macOS devices, apps and processes often prompt users to allow or deny access to device features, such as the camera, microphone, calendar, Documents folder, and more. These settings allow administrators to pre-approve or pre-deny access to these device features. When you configure these settings, you manage data access consent on behalf of your users. Your settings override their previous decisions.

The goal of these settings is to reduce the number of prompts by apps and processes.

This feature applies to:

  • macOS 10.14 and newer
  • Some settings apply to macOS 10.15 and newer.
  • These settings only apply on devices that have the privacy preferences profile installed before being upgraded.

Settings apply to: User approved device enrollment, Automated device enrollment

  • Apps and processes: Add apps or processes to configure access. Also enter:
    • Name: Enter a name for your app or process. For example, enter Microsoft Remote Desktop or Microsoft 365.

    • Identifier type: Your options:

      • Bundle ID: Select this option for apps.
      • Path: Select this option for non-bundled binaries, which is a process or executable.

      Helper tools embedded within an application bundle automatically inherit the permissions of their enclosing application bundle.

    • Identifier: Enter the app bundle ID, or the installation file path of the process or executable. For example, enter com.contoso.appname.

      To get the app bundle ID, open the Terminal app, and run the codesign command. This command identifies the code signature. So you can get the bundle ID and the code signature simultaneously.

    • Code requirement: Enter the code signature for the application or process.

      A code signature is created when an app or binary is signed by a developer certificate. To find the designation, run the codesign command manually in the Terminal app: codesign --display -r - /path/to/app/binary. The code signature is everything that appears after =>.

    • Enable static code validation: Choose Yes for the app or process to statically validate the code requirement. When set to Not configured, Intune doesn't change or update this setting.

      Enable this setting only if the process invalidates its dynamic code signature. Otherwise, use Not configured.

    • Block Camera: Yes prevents the app from accessing the system camera. You can't allow access to the camera. When set to Not configured, Intune doesn't change or update this setting.

    • Block Microphone: Yes prevents the app from accessing the system microphone. You can't allow access to the microphone. When set to Not configured, Intune doesn't change or update this setting.

    • Block screen recording: Yes blocks the app from capturing the contents of the system display. You can't allow access to screen recording and screen capture. When set to Not configured, Intune doesn't change or update this setting.

      Requires macOS 10.15 and newer.

    • Block input monitoring: Yes blocks the app from using CoreGraphics and HID APIs to listen to CGEvents and HID events from all processes. Yes also denies apps and processes from listening to and collecting data from input devices, such as a mouse, keyboard, or trackpad. You can't allow access to the CoreGraphics and HID APIs.

      When set to Not configured, Intune doesn't change or update this setting.

      Requires macOS 10.15 and newer.

    • Speech recognition: Your options:

      • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
      • Allow: Allows the app to access the system speech recognition, and allows sending speech data to Apple.
      • Block: Prevents the app from accessing the system speech recognition, and prevents sending speech data to Apple.

      Requires macOS 10.15 and newer.

    • Accessibility: Your options:

      • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
      • Allow: Allows the app to access to the system Accessibility app. This app includes closed captions, hover text, and voice control.
      • Block: Prevents the app from accessing the system Accessibility app.
    • Contacts: Your options:

      • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
      • Allow: Allows the app to access contact information managed by the system Contacts app.
      • Block: Prevents the app from accessing this contact information.
    • Calendar: Your options:

      • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
      • Allow: Allows the app to access calendar information managed by the system Calendar app.
      • Block: Prevents the app from accessing this calendar information.
    • Reminders: Your options:

      • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
      • Allow: Allows the app to access reminder information managed by the system Reminders app.
      • Block: Prevents the app from accessing this reminder information.
    • Photos: Your options:

      • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
      • Allow: Allows the app to access the pictures managed by the system Photos app in ~/Pictures/.photoslibrary.
      • Block: Prevents the app from accessing these pictures.
    • Media library: Your options:

      • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
      • Allow: Allows the app to access Apple Music, music and video activity, and the media library.
      • Block: Prevents the app from accessing this media.

      Requires macOS 10.15 and newer.

    • File provider presence: Your options:

      • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
      • Allow: Allows the app to access the File Provider app, and know when users are using files managed by the File Provider. A File Provider app allows other File Provider apps to access the documents and directories stored and managed by the containing app.
      • Block: Prevents the app from accessing the File Provider app.

      Requires macOS 10.15 and newer.

    • Full disk access: Your options:

      • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
      • Allow: Allows the app to access all protected files, including system administration files. Apply this setting with caution.
      • Block: Prevents the app from accessing these protected files.
    • System admin files: Your options:

      • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
      • Allow: Allows the app to access some files used in system administration.
      • Block: Prevents the app from accessing these files.
    • Desktop folder: Your options:

      • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
      • Allow: Allows the app to access files in the user’s Desktop folder.
      • Block: Prevents the app from accessing these files.

      Requires macOS 10.15 and newer.

    • Documents folder: Your options:

      • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
      • Allow: Allows the app to access files in the user’s Documents folder.
      • Block: Prevents the app from accessing these files.

      Requires macOS 10.15 and newer.

    • Downloads folder: Your options:

      • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
      • Allow: Allows the app to access files in the user’s Downloads folder.
      • Block: Prevents the app from accessing these files.

      Requires macOS 10.15 and newer.

    • Network volumes: Your options:

      • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
      • Allow: Allows the app to access files on network volumes.
      • Block: Prevents the app from accessing these files.

      Requires macOS 10.15 and newer.

    • Removable volumes: Your options:

      • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
      • Allow: Allows the app to access files on removable volumes, such as a hard disk.
      • Block: Prevents the app from accessing these files.

      Requires macOS 10.15 and newer.

    • System events: Your options:

      • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
      • Allow: Allows the app to use CoreGraphics APIs to send CGEvents to the system event stream.
      • Block: Prevents the app from using CoreGraphics APIs to send CGEvents to the system event stream.
    • Apple events: This setting allows apps to send a restricted Apple event to another app or process. Select Add to add a receiving app or process. Enter the following information of the receiving app or process:

      • Identifier type: Select Bundle ID if the receiving identifier is an application. Select Path if the receiving identifier is a process or executable.

      • Identifier: Enter the app bundle ID, or the installation path of the process receiving an Apple event.

      • Code requirement: Enter the code signature for the receiving application or process.

        A code signature is created when an app or binary is signed by a developer certificate. To find the designation, run the codesign command manually in the Terminal app: codesign --display -r -/path/to/app/binary. The code signature is everything that appears after =>.

      • Access: Allow a macOS Apple Event to be sent to the receiving app or process. Your options:

        • Not configured: Intune doesn't change or update this setting.
        • Allow: Allows the app or process to send the restricted Apple event to the receiving app or process.
        • Block: Prevents the app or process from sending a restricted Apple event to the receiving app or process.
    • Save your changes.

Restricted apps

Settings apply to: All enrollment types

  • Type of restricted apps list: Create a list of apps that users aren't allowed to install or use. Your options:

    • Not configured (default): Intune doesn't change or update this setting. By default, users might have access to apps you assign, and built-in apps.
    • Approved apps: List the apps that users are allowed to install. To stay compliant, users must not install other apps. Apps that are managed by Intune are automatically allowed, including the Company Portal app. Users aren't prevented from installing an app that isn't on the approved list. But if they do, it's reported in Intune.
    • Prohibited apps: List the apps (not managed by Intune) that users aren't allowed to install and run. Users aren't prevented from installing a prohibited app. If a user installs an app from this list, it's reported in Intune.
  • Apps list: Add apps to your list:

    • App Bundle ID: Enter the bundle ID of the app. You can add built-in apps and line-of-business apps. Apple's web site has a list of built-in Apple apps.

      To find the URL of an app, open the iTunes App Store, and search for the app. For example, search for Microsoft Remote Desktop or Microsoft Word. Select the app, and copy the URL. You can also use iTunes to find the app, and then use the Copy Link task to get the app URL.

    • App name: Enter a user-friendly name to help you identify the bundle ID. For example, enter Intune Company Portal app.

    • Publisher: Enter the publisher of the app.

  • Import a CSV file with details about the app, including the URL. Use the <app bundle ID>, <app name>, <app publisher> format. Or, Export to create a list of apps you added, in the same format.

Next steps

Assign the profile and monitor its status.

You can also restrict device features and settings on iOS/iPadOS devices.

Find that the Mail app randomly opens while you are working on your Mac running macOS Mojave?

There have been similar cases like this, with several users having reported it over on the forums. Apparently, the Mail app will just pop up into the screen while you are working on your Mac. It is indeed frustrating to have to minimize or close it from time to time, which interrupts your attention.

Now there are a couple of factors that can cause this issue, especially on the software level. It may well be an incorrect configuration in your Mac, a third-party email account conflict, or a software glitch. Whatever the cause is, there is always a fix for a particular issue. If not, a temporary workaround can be applied until a permanent fix is applied.

In this guide, we will discuss the probable causes of this together as well as share the suitable fixes associated with it. Hopefully, by the end of this guide, you will be able to fix your Mail app that opens randomly on Mojave.

Without further ado, let’s dive in!

TABLE OF CONTENTS

How to Fix Mail App Opens Randomly Mojave: 10 Ways

1. Update macOS Mojave.

The first and most likely cause which your Mail app is not behaving normally is because of a bug in the macOS Mojave version itself.

To fix this issue with the Mail app, you must make sure that your macOS version is also up to date. It’s possible that by the time you read this post that Apple may have already addressed this bug and released a patch for you to install.

Here’s how you can install the latest macOS updates on your Mac if you haven’t already:

  1. Go ahead and click on the Apple menu icon, then the System Preferences option, and then click on the Software Update option.
  2. Then, click on the Update Now option to install it. If you can’t find this option, that means your software is already up to date.
  1. Finally, you can opt to click on the More info option to view details about the update. If you are an advanced user, you can choose a specific update to install and ignore the ones that are not relevant to your application.

Once you see the message that your macOS is updated, your applications such as your Mail app and other Apple core applications will also have been updated. You may test once again by carrying out your everyday tasks with your Mac and see if the Mail app opens randomly again.

2. Check your Mail Settings.

Another possibility why your Mail app is popping up randomly onto the screen is because it may have been misconfigured without you knowing it. This happens especially if we’ve made any changes to the Mac, such as recently downloading a new application or updating the macOS. We will not know for sure where the issue exactly is, but the following steps will be helpful to check and verify if the configurations for the Mail app are correct and should behave the way it was intended.

Take note there are two parts to do this: 1) Mail App Settings and 2) macOS settings. We will go over both and show which of all the settings are required and which are not.

Here’s what you need to do in your Mail app settings:

  1. Go ahead and click your Mail app, then click on the Preferences option and then General option.
  2. Then, on the Check for New Messages option, click on the choices, and set the value to Manually. You will get to see new messages if only you click on the Get Mail button.
  1. In the same setting page, uncheck the box where it says Prefer opening messages in split view when in full screen. This will prevent opening a split view window when there are any notifications from your Mail app.
  2. Now click on the Rules tab on the top section and check the email rules that are currently set up for your Mail app. If there are rules that use a script that triggers a notification, select the name of the rule on the list, and click on the (-) remove option.
  3. Finally, close your email app and relaunch it. Minimize your mail app by clicking on the yellow ( – ) button at the top right corner of your application window.

The above changes will directly affect how your Mail app behaves but does not address the macOS itself, which we will be the next part we will go through.

Here’s what you should do in your macOS settings:

  1. Go ahead and click on the Apple menu icon, then click on the System Preferences option.
  2. Then, click on the Mission Control option and uncheck the box that says Displays have separate Spaces. This will avoid triggering split display if you are previously using multiple displays.
  3. Now go back to the System Preferences page, and click on the Users & Groups option.
  4. Next, click on the Login Items option and look for your email account or any account associated with your Mail app on the list. Click on ( – ) or remove option, and this will prevent your application from opening automatically after logging in to macOS.
  1. After that, go back to the System Preferences page, and click on the Energy Saver option. Then, uncheck the Enable Power Nap checkbox to prevent checking new email messages when your macOS goes to sleep.
Disable Mail App Macos
  1. Finally, restart your macOS Mojave by clicking on the Apple menu icon and click on the Restart option.

After your Mac successfully starts up, the Mail application should not open on its own automatically. If you wish to use the Mail application, then you may launch it and opt to minimize it so that it stays in the background. Again you should find that after completing the above steps that the Mail app will not annoyingly abrupt you during your work. If you still find that the issue persists, then keep reading.

3. Uninstall Any Third-Party Email Software.

Several users have also found this issue also occurred due to a conflict between the Mail app and third-party installed email services. This issue is similar to when you have two antivirus software installed on a machine. Since both services use the same protocol and resources, it can cause problems with your system.

To fix it, you will need to temporarily uninstall any third-party email software which you have installed on your Mac and then retry using the Mail app.

Here’s how you can do it:

  1. Go ahead and click on the Finder icon in the Dock section of your macOS Mojave and click on Applications in the Finder sidebar.
  2. Then, find and double-click the Uninstall (App) or (App) Uninstaller on the 3rd party email software folder for the uninstall process.
  3. Now, if the application does not have the uninstaller program, drag the 3rd party email software folder or icon to the Trash at the end of the Dock section.
  4. Finally, repeat the steps above if you have more 3rd party email software installed in your macOS Mojave.

If your application was purchased from the App Store, learn how to uninstall the app using Launchpad.

4. Disable Google Calendar Notification.

If you are using a Gmail account on your Mail app, then you might want to check your Calendar notifications setting.

Google’s Calendar app is notorious for having issues with how their notifications work. So if you use it extensively, you will want to make sure that the settings for the notifications are disabled. For instance, there is a hidden schedule notification inside your Google Calendar that has been reported by users to be the cause of this random pop-up issue on your Mail app. We will guide you on how to locate this setting as well as all the other settings that you should disable to prevent notifications from the Google Calendar to pop-up.

Here’s what you should do:

  1. Go ahead and log in to your Google Calendar page using your web browser.
  2. Then, click the gear icon on the upper-right corner of the page and then click the Settings option on the drop-down menu.
  1. Now, click on your calendar name under Settings for my calendars section and click on the Event Notifications.
  2. Check for the email notification schedule if there’s any. If there is an email notification set up, remove it by clicking the ( X ) icon or Remove Notification option.
  1. Also, scroll down on the All-day Event Notification section and do the same procedure in Step 4.
  2. Next, on the Other notifications section, change the drop-down choices from “Email” to “None” value to remove email notifications.
  1. Finally, close your Mail app and relaunch it.

Having disabled all of the hidden notification options in your Google Calendar, any events or actions related to the Google Calendar from your Gmail account will not be notified. This will help stop your Mail from suddenly popping-up on your screen every time there’s a hidden notification in your Gmail account.

5. Generate New App Password for Gmail.

Again this is primarily directed to users who have a Gmail account.

Gmail recommends from the moment you sign up with them that you add an extra layer of security for your email accounts. That’s a good thing! But sometimes, this additional layer of security messes up the way the Gmail account is synced with your Mail app. It may notify you unconventionally that your application is not safe because the application identifies it as a third-party email address account. Hence, it does not have a proper notification protocol to notify the user with contrary to what Apple provides it.

One safe and secure way to go about this is to generate a new password for it via your Mail app.

Here’s how you can do it:

  1. Go ahead and click Mail option on your Mail app on your macOS Mojave.
  2. Then, click the Preferences option and then click the Accounts option.
  3. Now, select your Gmail account and then click on ( – ) icon or also known as the Remove option.
  1. After that, close your Mail app and relaunch it.
  2. Go back to the Mail option, then click on Preferences, and then Accounts option.
  3. Next, click on the ( + ) icon or also known as the Add Account option, choose the “Other Mail Account…” option instead, and enter your full Gmail email account address.
  1. Then, launch your web browser and sign in to your Google Accounts page.
  2. Click on the Security option on the left side and go to the Signing in to Google section. Generate an application password for your Mail app using the App Password option and follow the instructions.
  3. Finally, go back to your Mail app and use the app password that is newly generated to sign in your Gmail account on your Mail app.

Now that your Gmail account has a new app password for your Mail app, it should not notify you that you need to secure your account. If the issue persists, keep reading as we’ve got five more methods for you to try out.

6. Remove Email Account from Mail App and Forward All Emails.

This is an alternative solution in case none of the solutions above work for you.

For instance, if you are having a hard time setting up your Gmail account, then you can opt to remove it from your Mail app if it continuously causes you trouble. You can refer to the Steps 1 to 4 of the previous method on how to remove your Gmail account from your Mail app.

⚠️ Note

This method can also be applied with other email services such as Microsoft Outlook, Yahoo, and Zoho. Please refer to the links attached for the respective guides on how to set it up for those services.

If you do proceed with removing your Gmail account from your Mail app, then the following workaround can help set up a forward filter on all of your emails on your Gmail account to your primary email account. This ensures that you are kept notified with the emails but without having the actual account on your device.

Here’s how you can do it according to Google Support:

  1. Go ahead and log in to your Gmail account using a web browser.
  2. Then, click on the gear icon or Settings at the top-right portion of the page.
  3. Now, click Settings on the drop-down menu and click on the Forwarding and POP/IMAP option.
  4. Scroll down to the Forwarding section and click the Add a forwarding address option. The forwarded address can be your main email address or an email address where you prefer your emails to be forwarded to.
  1. Enter your primary email address to the space provided and click on Next, then Proceed, and then the OK option.
  2. Check your primary email address and check for a verification message. Click the verification link in that message.
  3. Next, go back to the page where your Gmail setting is and refresh the page.
  4. Again, click the Forwarding and POP/IMAP option and scroll down to the Forwarding section. Choose Forward a copy of incoming email to option and choose to keep Gmail’s copy in the inbox.
  5. Finally, scroll down at the bottom of the page and click Save Changes.

With the forwarded setup shown above, you can have your Gmail messages appear in your primary email account on your Mail app, which should stop the conflicts. Again, this is a workaround to the other methods, so it is up to you whether you want to go through with this solution.

7. Force Quit Mail App.

Settings

If you haven’t already force quit your Mail app on your Mac, then it’s certainly worth doing so. By force quitting your Mail application, you’re inherently terminating its process, which will allow you to jumpstart it.

Doing this doesn’t mean your email account will miss out on any new emails since we’re just restarting the Mail app itself and not your email account. It’s a useful trick which we’ve found to be extremely effective from our previous guide on tackling the various issues with the Mail app on macOS Catalina.

To do this, you will need to press and hold the Option, Command, and Esc (escape) keys simultaneously on your keyboard to open the Force Quit window.

Under the Force Quit Application section, a list of applications that are launched will be provided. Search and click the Mail app on the list and click on the Force Quit button at the bottom.

This will terminate the Mail application, and you will not be bothered by it until you relaunch the Mail app. Try it and see if it works. Let us know down below whether this method works for you.

8. Prevent Applications from Re-Opening.

It is also possible that you have previously opened the Mail application before the shutdown or sleep process. There is a feature on your Mac that allows you to resume the applications you are working on after you restart or resume from a sleep process. So your Mail will still be running in the background and might be able to disturb you when you are working on your computer.

To fix this, you need to deselect” Reopen windows when logging back in” option when prompted before the restart process. This will prevent all applications to open automatically after you log back into your Mac. With this, you get to choose to open the applications you only need at the moment.

Another way to close applications and prevent them from reopening is in your Mac’s settings. To locate these settings, click on the Apple menu icon, then click on System Preferences. Next, click on the General option. Now scroll down and check the box that says “Close window when quitting an app” option. Selecting this option will proceed to close the Mail app window as soon as you’re done using the Mail app.

9. Restart Device in Safe Mode.

Restarting your Mac is a standard de-facto solution for most issues experienced. It is an effective solution that is recommended by Apple themselves, especially if there are errors encountered in the operating system (OS) level.

It’s a relatively quick method and does not result in any of your data or information being erased. You can verify this by going onto Apple’s documentation for carrying out Safe Mode for Mac machines.

Here’s how you can do it:

  1. Go ahead and restart your macOS Mojave by clicking on the Apple menu icon, and then click on the Restart option.
  1. Then immediately press and hold the Shift key on your keyboard until the Apple logo appears. If you don’t see the Apple logo, learn what to do.
  2. Next, release the Shift key when the login window appears. If your startup disk is encrypted, learn more about what to do.
  3. Finally, when your macOS has fully loaded, restart your computer by clicking on the Apple menu icon and click on the Restart option. Do not press any keys to startup normally.

By doing this process, here are the things that it does to your Mac:

  • Safe mode verifies your startup disk and attempts to repair directory issues if needed.
  • It loads only required or core kernel extensions.
  • The process prevents startup items and login items from opening automatically that may have conflicts with your other applications.
  • It also disables user-installed fonts and other customized settings.
  • Finally, it deletes font caches, kernel cache, and other system cache files

If the Mail app issue persists even after you the process, you will also want to check if your Mac may have incompatible login items. But most of the time, by carrying out the Safe Mode restart, the issue will get resolved as your system cache will have been rebuilt and updated.

10. Contact Apple Support.

If none of the solutions in this guide work for you or if you find solutions such as restarting using the Safe Mode a little too complicated, then we always recommend that you bring in your Mac to your nearest Apple Store. They can cover pretty much anything with regards to Apple products, especially software and hardware repair.

Moreover, if you have done everything you can from this guide and think that this is a bug with macOS Mojave itself, then we ask that you write a feedback to Apple. This way, you will be helping them collect the data they need to fast track the bug fix process. Be sure to mention what version of Mail app and macOS Mojave you are using. The more of us who report, the sooner we can get a patch for it. 🙂

As we close this guide for today, we would like to thank you for reading and supporting us. We hope that this article has helped you fix your “Mail app opens randomly in Mojave (macOS)” issue. If you have questions related to this topic, please feel free to leave a comment below, and we will love to help out. ❤

If this guide helped you, please share it. 🙂